Month: July 2014

Business vs. Desire by Maura Timko

The following blog appeared originally on the Great River Facebook page as part of a discussion about the use of digital tools in the family. It was suggested to CMI as a read that would be of interest to the Mason community.  This blog was prompted by a question to Maura Timko from Janet Pressley-Barr regarding screen time and battles related to screen time in Maura Timko’s home.  Here is her response. Janet – I cannot answer your question briefly. I will not go into detail about what our screen time looks like now, because my boys are so much older. That is another conversation! But I can talk about how screens were handled in my home when my boys were much smaller. I think it will be more relevant to the group. Recalling the days when my boys were in elementary school, I imposed very strict limits on their screen time. (I love how Jenn Stec places the responsibility to turn off the screens directly with the child – well done!) In our home, we had a …

Living Math . . .Is it Possible? – On Purpose and Intentional Living-including Mathematics by Christina Pittman

In an effort to make this applicable to the greater audience, I won’t insert much of my own personal journey with math, but you should know this nugget about our family and math: We don’t love it. At least we didn’t. It was a subject on a list to be checked-off, especially for my youngest daughter, age 10. Our daily math instruction went like this: 1. Complete corrections on previous day’s math lesson 2. Teach current lesson 3. Complete 30 problems 4. Cry at regular intervals In hopes to discover the missing link, I attended the Bazaks’ Math is More Than Passing a Test session at the recent CMI Conference. The Bazaks discussed the importance of bringing math into the students’ context. The missing link was that my daughter did not have a math problem that she wanted and needed to solve. She had no context for which to apply the concepts and formulas she was practicing in her textbook. If we are to know the child and the needs of the child, we need to do so in the subject of math as well. …

A First Year Teacher in a Charlotte Mason Charter School by Miss Lengle

Interview, interview, update my resumé, interview, complete my clearances and send out copies and answer these questions: Why do I want this job? What sets this job apart from others? What is my teaching philosophy? Why do I want to teach here? After Graduating from East Stroudsburg University in 2012, these words and questions boggled my mind. I was constantly researching school districts and kept coming up with the same answers to these questions. “I want this job because I love to teach and enjoy being around children. I want this job because I am dedicated and willing to go the extra mile. I think that children are ongoing learners, and we need to teach them self-discovery.” “I want to teach here because . . . .” That was a tough one. All the schools are so different. Then I received the call to be the 1st and 2nd grade teacher at Gillingham Charter School. A CHARTER SCHOOL as my first full time job?! But I’ve only ever taught in a regular public school district, and I …

The Parents’ Union School by the Hon. Mrs. Franklin, C.B.E. — continued

As he came away .  .  .  .continued So far the P.U.S. methods were considered suitable for girls, but people wondered about boys.  A friend of mine, Mr. Underhill, who was about to start a school in Kent and who had always been rather suspicious with regard to Charlotte Mason’s teaching as presented to him through me, was persuaded to come to hear her speak at a meeting organised at my parents’ house in Kensington Palace Gardens.  As he came away, entirely won over by Charlotte Mason’s philosophy, humility and inspiration, he said, ‘I take off my hat to Miss Mason.  I should be proud to be allowed to work under her.’  He then engaged a ‘House of Education’ student and put his lower forms into the P.U.S. A great joy came to Charlotte Mason when the P.N.E.U. decided to print and publish her pamphlet on A Liberal Education for All, which they circulated to all the educational committees of the country.  Most of the authorities ignored it, but Mr. Household, Secretary for Education for Gloucestershire, …