Month: June 2013

Narration – The Act of Knowing by Carroll Smith

In this blog I want to define narration and some of its effects on the minds of those who narrate.  Before I define narration, let’s consider why it fell into such disfavor which I believe will help us understand its meaning and value. Mason gives us a hint.  She (1925/1954) believes that, “We are paying in our education of today for the wave of materialism that spread over the country a hundred years ago.  People do not take the trouble to be definitely materialistic now, but our educational thought has received a trend which carries us whither we would not” (p. 260).  Books (textbooks), of course, as most of you know continue to be written in this very matterialistic (see note below) style.  They are loaded with facts written in an outline form directed towards preparing children to memorise facts. They do not “warm the imagination.”  All the “livingness” needed to make books interesting (that is books clothed in the language of the novel, the literary style) has been sucked out of them leaving children …

Some History on Narration, Part I by Carroll Smith

The earlier blog posts on narration reviewed the work of teachers who were involved in PNEU schools.  These I hope have “warmed your imagination” a bit about this topic.  Hopefully, it has created questions, some of which have been posted as comments.  I will get to those and any others before I finish with these posts on narration.  For this blog I want to go back to the beginning. That is a long way back.  All the way back to the beginning of the Jewish people is where we will go (One could also probably trace this through other people groups as well, but this is the one most familiar to me).  Before we do, I want to give a couple of reminders.  First, print was not available.  Whatever very few books might have existed at that time, were handwritten.  Second, very, very few were able to read the written words.  In fact, in Nehemiah 8:8, “Ezra open the book.  All the people could see him because he was standing above them; and as he …