Month: October 2012

The Life of Education: Reintroducing Charlotte Mason to Elementary Students at Covenant College by Dr. Jack Beckman

Sometimes it takes a catalyst to get a good thing going.  Having shelved the EDU 350 course entitled “The Educational Thought and Practice of Charlotte Mason” many years ago; it took one student spearheading a movement to resurrect Charlotte at Covenant College – that student being HollyAnne Dobbins.  Originally designed by Dr. Steve Kauffman, the course languished after being taught only once about ten years ago.  However after numerous conversations and meetings, HollyAnne became convinced she could gather a group of interested and likeminded students to make the course a go – again.  I challenged her to deluge the Education Department Chair with requests.  Several weeks later he came by my office and asked for me to stop having students bother him, and that the course would be in the next catalog framed for Spring 2013. Thus, ten or so students will begin a journey into the life and work of Charlotte Mason for college credit – a first, I think in this current age. The original syllabus was lost long ago, and even though …

This I Know by Gladys Schaefer

Charlotte Mason has become a sweet presence in my life, much like a spiritual mother.  Her wisdom has nourished me and has influenced how I’ve raised my children and taught my students. Her desire to follow God and learn from Him is so evident in her writings, both in the six volume set that our generation knows as “The Original Home Schooling Series” and in the six volume set of her meditations on scripture, “The Savior of the World.”  In volume 5 of her meditations, “The Savior of the World, The Great Controversy” on pages 193 – 196, she quotes John Ruskin as he discusses the fresco he calls the “Vaulted Book” that she saw in Florence, Italy. “The descent of the Holy Ghost is on the left hand (of the roof) as you enter. The Madonna and Disciples are gathered in an upper chamber.” He goes on to describe the fresco in detail.  She concludes with these words, “ The Florentines of the Middle Ages believed, not only that the seven Liberal Arts were …