Month: August 2012

In Her Footsteps: A Young Scholar’s Pilgrimage to Ambleside by HollyAnne Dobbins

“Sun, moon, and stars, by day and night, At God’s commandment give us light; And when we wake, and while we sleep, Their watch, like guardian angels, keep The bright blue sky above our head, The soft green earth on which we tread, The ocean rolling round the land, Were made by God’s almighty hand. Sweet flowers that hill and dale adorn, Far fruit trees fields of grass and corn, The clouds that rise, the showers that fall, The winds that blow—God sent them all. The beasts that graze with downward eye, The birds that perch, and sing, and fly, The fishes swimming in the sea, God’s creatures are as well as we. But us He formed for better things, As servants of the King of kings, With lifted hands and open face, And thankful heart to seek His grace.” ~Montgomery “How All Things Praise the Lord” from The Ambleside Geography Books- Book 1 by Charlotte M. Mason I’m sitting in the Armitt library. It seems just a week ago that I stood up in …

Crossing Guards and a “Nation of Idiots” by Jen Gagnon

If I have not timed my trip well, I end up becoming part of a long procession of vehicles stuck behind a school bus. If it is around 2:30 in the afternoon, it is the high school buses, and if it is an hour later, the elementary school kids are being dropped off.  For the younger set, you know when the bus is going to stop, for along the route spaced at 50 yard intervals or so there is a small cluster of parents waiting for the return of their children. The process is quite interesting.  First the bus comes to a complete stop. A mechanical crossing guard arm on the driver’s side springs out with a large STOP sign, showing oncoming traffic, and those behind the bus, that they must stop. The doors are then opened; the child walks down the bus stairs to the road and hesitates at the front of the bus.  Looking for the driver’s signal of a clear passage, he then walks confidently across the road with his eyes on …

Homeschooling Reflections: An Interview with Cheri Struble and Kaley Struble Kelly

I (Cheri) am entering my 15th year of homeschooling using the Charlotte Mason method. It’s been quite a journey, one that has educated me just as much as I have educated my children. I have one graduate, and my next is entering high school this year with seven more in various years to go. My daughter, who graduated over two years ago, gets a lot of questions from other homeschooling parents about her experiences being educated with the Mason method. We have noticed, and I have felt myself, that taking the plunge not only with homeschooling your child but choosing a distinct method can leave people feeling, well, afraid. Will this really turn out okay? Am I making the right choice? What will this look like in 10 years? As an aspiring journalist, Mason graduate, and last year an assistant teacher at Willow Tree Community School, Kaley decided to interview me about my experiences as a parent using the CM method. Kaley: What was your most difficult adjustment or realization about CM as a young …

A Mom Says, “Thank You” by Nicolle Hutchinson

When I say that “we couldn’t have done it without ya,” I truly mean that our public school would not have opened and made it through this year successfully without the support of the CLUSA Mason community. You have inquired about us. You have encouraged us.  You have sent articles to us. You have trained us. You have visited us. You have brainstormed solutions for us. You have even written a curriculum that we love to follow! I send out a big THANK YOU for making Gillingham what we are. My “thanks” is not enough, though. Please keep reading to hear the “thanks” you deserve from the people of Gillingham: When asked how he liked working at Gillingham, our music teacher, paused and then said, “I’d live in a cardboard box if I had to in order to teach at this school.” Why? While in college, Mr. K as the students refer to him, was looking for something different. He didn’t like what he saw in the schools as a student teacher or as a …