Month: August 2010

Artist Study: Makoto Fujimura by Bonnie Buckingham

In January 2011, an Illuminated Edition of the Kings James Bible will be published to celebrate 400th Anniversary of the King James Bible. The artist: Makoto Fujimura, Japanese American artist, Head of the International Arts Movement, a writer and speaker, and a Christian. The Anniversary Edition will print the six –color metallic process for the Four Gospels.  This is what he will be remembered by.  This is a departure from the traditional art within sacred texts:  contemporary.  So how do we introduce an abstract artist to your students? Let’s start with what a Picture Talk is. It is to open the eyes and mind to beauty and this leads to Charlotte’s principle about ideas. A Parent’s Review by Miss Hammond (from the Art Appreciation- Picture study page of Ambleside Online), says: “The greatest picture is that which conveys to the mind the greatest number of the greatest ideas–and an idea is greater in proportion as it is received by a higher faculty of the mind, and as it more fully occupies, exercises and exalts the …

The 21st Century Mason School by Jennifer Spencer

What image comes to your mind when hear the words “21st Century School”? Computers? Every child working on a laptop? SMART Boards? Gadgets and gizmos? Charlotte Mason? One of the tricky things about adhering to a philosophy that peaked a century ago is that it is so tempting to hearken back to a bygone era and get stuck there with a romanticized picture of the governess and her cherub-faced charges frolicking in the meadow. But logic tells us that human children cannot have changed that much in one hundred years. Teaching then was hard work, just as it is now. Finding books to use in the curriculum must have been difficult as well, because Mason and her assistants spent a lot of time reading and evaluating new books, and she sometimes says something about such-and-such a book being the best that was available at the moment, as though she were waiting for someone to write something better. My point here is that Mason adhered to principles as opposed to specific materials. She used what was …